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Prime cuts other channels' lunches with big Olympic numbers

landscape illustration

Prime didn't quite manage to beat TV One's 2008 ratings for the Olympic opening ceremony, but, not surprisingly, broadcasting the Games has certainly helped steal some eyeballs off the other channels, with Prime's share and time spent watching numbers increasing dramatically over the previous four weeks and all channels except for Prime and Sky losing share. 

All People 5+

Average Daily Reach

Average Time Spent
Viewing (per viewer)
HH:MM

Share of viewers %

All Day

Previous 4
Weeks

W/c 29 July

Previous 4
Weeks

W/c 29 July

Previous 4
Weeks

W/c 29 July

PRIME

1,046,050

1,877,076

0:48:39

1:50:14

6.2

21.1

TVOne

1,987,949

1,912,657

1:50:40

1:36:48

25.6

18.8

TV2

1,737,619

1,615,823

1:19:46

1:14:32

16.1

12.3

TV3

1,652,765

1,562,238

1:06:23

1:03:39

12.8

10.1

FOUR

766,792

712,719

0:45:32

0:39:00

4.1

2.8

SKY Network

1,478,775

1,519,597

2:55:13

3:19:43

30.3

30.9

It's estimated two billion people watched the 100m final around the world (adding more fuel to the fire, NBC chose not to show it live and saved it for its prime-time recap). But Nielsen says it is difficult to provide ratings for the 100m final in New Zealand as the programme information generally does not detail specific events unless it is of a substantial duration (such as hockey games etc). But, judging by the numbers between 8:45am to 9:00am on Monday 6 August, Prime's total audience reach was 220,490 all people 5+ and share was 37 percent (ratings for the 100m in Beijing weren't available but the average for the four Mondays prior to the Olympics on Prime was a reach of 4,224 and share of 0.5 percent).

Not surprisingly, New Zealand's golden haul on Friday 3 August nabbed the biggest viewership so far, comfortably beating the Opening Ceremony at 14.5 ratings points in the 25-54 demographic. 

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