StopPress

Marketing, advertising & media intelligence

Movings/Shakings: 3 July

As Lion says goodbye to one of its prize marketers, Frith Morrissey joins TBWA\, Will Seal shifts from PR to media and JWT's Rod Prosser heads for France.  

Aussie drift 

Fresh from releasing a new campaign for Steinlager Pure directed by and starring Taika Waititi, Steinlager's marketing manager Todd Gordon is set to depart at the end of July to take up a role with the Dairy and Drinks division of Lion in Melbourne. One of the undoubted highlights for Gordon was overseeing the strategic development and execution for the Steinlager 'We Believe' campaign to leverage Steinlager's sponsorship of the All Blacks in the Rugby World Cup year. 

"The campaign incorporated multiple touchpoints and multiple channels including all traditional media, digital, NPD and inmarket," it says on his LinkedIn profile. "The result was significant positive shifts in all metrics—consumer engagement, brand penetration, sales, distribution, market share and profitability."  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOaL0HmaN-8 Gordon, who also controls the Corona brand, started with Lion in 2007 and was initially given responsibility for Beck's, after shifting from a marketing manager role at Slingshot. He then had two years as marketing manager for Speight's. 

Putting on the Frith

Frith Morrissey has been appointed as senior account director on the ANZ account service team. "Frith has more than 15 years experience in the advertising industry and that knowledge, expertise and first-class client service ethic will be an enormous asset to both the agency and a valued client like ANZ," says chief executive David Walden. "Quite frankly, Frith joins the agency when our strength in this area has never been better. She's a bloody great suit joining an already well-established team of clever, professional and hard working ad people. We're chuffed she's joined us." Morrissey has worked across a number of high-profile national, trans-tasman and international brands including Coca-Cola, BankDirect, Foodtown and Woolworths.

"Whybin\TBWA are producing some really impressive work, not only on ANZ but throughout their stable of clients and they've always had a reputation for being an amazing place to work. I was really excited to be offered the role and jumped at the chance to join such a brilliant team."

Signed, Sealed, Delivered

Photographer, writer, PR consultant and media co-ordinator Will Seal has moved from Porter Novelli to the position of sponsorship manager at MediaWorks TV. "I've moved slightly out of PR back into broader marketing," he says. "Well, sort of, there's also lots of internal PR work to be done."

Dream weavers

In May 2011, JWT New Zealand’s managing director Simon Lendrum sent an internal email to all staff, which looked like a typical international business network request for new business ideas. In reality, it was an internal competition to reward a staff member with their dream holiday; something they’ve always thought about doing but wouldn’t typically be able to do. 

The brief was for each staff member to tell the JWT network what their “dream” was. Senior art director Rod Prosser is an avid Tour de France spectator and a long time road cyclist and club racer. He submitted his dream via video decked out in his cycling gear saying he was “too old” to compete in the Tour de France but he would love to take up the challenge of the L’etape du Tour, an amateur cyclist branch of the Tour where cyclists from around the world can enter to ride one of the most challenging legs of the race just before the professionals complete it.

L’etape du Tour 2012 over the Pyrenees is one of the most challenging in years, at 200km long and a total vertical lift of 5km broken into four 10-15km climbs. Of the 10,000 cyclists who enter, 3,000 typically fail to finish. Prosser has worked at JWT for 24 years (more than the average age of most people at the agency, apparently) and has worked on a variety of big brands including Ford, Shell, AMP, HSBC, Heart Children and McDonald's in his time. He even claims to have designed the first Happy Meal Box here in New Zealand (they actually came in cardboard boxes in those days).    
 

This is a community discussion forum. Comment is free but please respect our rules:

  1. Don’t be abusive or use sweary type words
  2. Don’t break the law: libel, slander and defamatory comments are forbidden
  3. Don’t resort to name-calling, mean-spiritedness, or slagging off
  4. Don’t pretend to be someone else.

If we find you doing these things, your comments will be edited without recourse and you may be asked to go away and reconsider your actions.
We respect the right to free speech and anonymous comments. Don’t abuse the privilege.