StopPress

Marketing, advertising & media intelligence

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Introducing the Generosity Journal

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The discussion underneath the stories on StopPress can be extremely entertaining and quite revealing, but things often veer towards the negative. So we're trying to balance the ledger a bit and, in conjunction with The One Percent Collective, we're launching a new section for agencies, clients and anyone else in the wider marcomms industry to claim the moral high ground and celebrate the good work of their competitors.

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Whittaker's makes it a three-peat in Readers Digest most trusted list, but what's it worth?

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The brands that New Zealanders trust the most were announced by Readers Digest recently, with Whittaker's winning first place for the third year in a row, and also taking out the New Zealand icon and confectionery sections. So do these little badges make a difference to consumers' decision-making processes? And are most trusted lists like this pointless?

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Remembering Rob Coats: great artist, great man

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People will recognise the work of Coats Design from the aisles of their local supermarket and logos of their local retailers. It's responsible for wrapping design around the products of big Kiwi names such as Michael Hill, Rodd & Gunn, Barker's of Geraldine, and last year's redesign of Hubbards cereal. And the man who kicked it all off was founder Rob Coats, who passed away on the weekend and is remembered fondly by his colleagues and contemporaries in the industry.

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Reading more, remembering less: is the internet making us stupid? Or just more selective?

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One fact that has stuck with me over the years—and flashes up in front of me occasionally when I'm deep in a time-sucking online/social media rabbit hole—is that the same part of the brain that responds so favourably to pokie machines is the same part of the brain that responds so favourably to the constant arrival of notifications on your phone, in your inbox or on social networks. So, like digital meerkats, many of us are constantly popping our heads up and looking for the next information fix. And, as a recent Victoria University study has shown, the online realm is having an impact on our reading behaviour.

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Sugar fusion: Whittaker's and Griffin's create a hybrid, call on Kiwis to cover their property in hundreds and thousands

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Whittaker’s and Griffin’s have colluded in sugary goodness to produce a limited edition product mashup called the '100s and 1000s Bar' that combines Cookie Bears, chocolate and a significant sprinkling of hundreds and thousands. And to promote their product fusion, which was released on 21 July and will be available for only three months, the co-conspirators have launched a competition via a Facebook-hosted microsite that encourages Kiwis to cover random items in hundreds and thousands and then send in images of the results.

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Hercules mobile ad fights against fat fingers

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As a study by Trademob in late 2012 showed, around 40 percent of mobile ad clicks are either fraudulent or accidental, with more than half of them a result of 'fat-finger syndrome'. That's obviously bad for conversions and one major reason why advertisers pay less for mobile impressions (Google added another click into the mix to ensure users really wanted to visit a site). But Y&R, MEC and mobile advertising sales agency Mobile Embrace are trying to fight unintentional clicks another way: by making slightly more interesting mobile ads.

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Vandalism vs. brandalism: Jonah from Tonga leaves his 'dick-tation' calling card

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While tagging is often seen as an activity worthy of punishment, brands often seem to get away with it. BNZ and Unitec have done it in recent years. And Comedy Central got in on the stencil action recently to promote the new series of Chris Lilley's Jonah from Tonga, which plays on Mondays at 9.25pm. But as a Sideswipe reader asked, why the hypocrisy and is it appropriate to have a big brand-sanctioned schlong on the streets?

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Sami's self-deprecating defecation education aims to convince Kiwis to finish their business with a flushable wipe

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Back in 2010, tampon brand Kotex confronted the Netherlands and used the word vagina in an ad. Last year, Carefree followed suit and online tampon service Hello Flo went even further with a couple of hilarious spots. The same trend towards openness seems to be developing in the bum wiping sector, long a haven of rolly dogs, tacky euphemisms and smiling actors, and Kleenex Cottonelle has convinced comedian Madeleine Sami, someone who seems to revel in public displays of awkwardness, to get on board and spruik its moistened wipes to New Zealanders. PLUS: Why wastewater experts are waging war on 'flushable' wipes.

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Green Cross Health launches Living Well, becomes a publisher—UPDATED

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Green Cross Health, which owns the Unichem and Life Pharmacy brands and has a range of other medical interests, has announced the launch of Living Well, an owned media channel that is being produced and published in partnership with Tangible Media. The first issue of the quarterly publication will be released in September 2014 and distributed by name to 100,000 households in the defined target market, which will be drawn from Green Cross Health’s loyalty programme. An additional 50,000 units will then also be distributed via the pharmacy conglomerate’s network (phase two of the project will also see digital and social elements introduced). PLUS: What are the legal rules that govern content marketing of products that make therapeutic claims? Updated with answers from Brook Milbank, the head of marketing at Green Cross Health.

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Countdown and Foodstuffs continue the tit-for-tat discount banter

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Over the course of the last week, the nation’s major supermarket chains have been embroiled in a discount battle that the Herald has dubbed ‘bread wars’. The first shots of this this retail skirmish were fired on 17 July, when Countdown dropped the price of its budget white bread from $1.48 to only $1, a discount that was immediately promoted via radio and television advertisements under the ‘Price Lockdown’ banner that has been giving Kiwis reduced prices since October last year. On the very day that Countdown dropped its bread prices, New World released a similar campaign and shortly thereafter Pak 'n Save did the same. And this effectively served as the next phase of a back-and-forth discount battle that has seen both Foodstuffs and Countdown taking aim at each other in numerous campaigns.

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